Physical Activity Doesn’t Increase The Risk Of Osteoarthritis

207

If you are concerned that your physical exercise may increase the risk of knee osteoarthritis, you don’t need to worry about it. Because the recent study found that physical exercise doesn’t increase the risk of osteoarthritis in the knee. So, you can keep moving without any hesitation.

Credit: publichealth.com

Osteoarthritis usually appears in some particular parts of our body like knees, hips, and hands. An article published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology revealed that some exercises can reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis. The research findings also say that physical activity is not linked with the development of osteoarthritis in the knee.

Credit: verywellhealth.com

A co-lead author of the study, Thomas Perry explained the research finding in a press release. Perry said, “Knowing that the amount of physical activity and time spent doing it is not associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis is important evidence for both clinicians and the public who may need to consider this when prescribing physical activity for health.”

Credit: homage.com

In the clinical of Stanford University in California, Dr. Matthew Baker said, “Physical activity is complex and difficult to measure. Prior work suggests that vigorous exercise for greater than 4 hours per day likely increases the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis, but moderate levels of physical activity may not.”